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hH 




1920 



HYANNI5 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Hyannis Normal School 

IN CONTINUOUS 5L5SION 



Fall Term opens September 15, 1920 
Spring Term opens January 31, 1921 



SUMMER SESSIONS 

First Section opens June 29, 1920 
Second Section opens August 2, 1920 



STUDLNTS MAY ENTER AT THE. 
BEGINNING OF EACH TERM 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/catalogcircularf1920stat 



STATE 

NORMAL SCHOOL 



HYANNIS, MASS. 



CATALOGUE AND CIRCULAR 
FOR 1920 

Summer and Winter Sessions 



boston 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS 

32 DERNE STREET 

1920 



Publication of this Document 
approved by the 

Supervisor of Administration. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION. 



PAYSON SMITH, ..... Commissioner of Education. 

Advisory Board of Education. 

FREDERICK P. FISH 84 State Street, Boston. 

SARAH LOUISE ARNOLD, . . . 300 The Fenway, Boston. 
Mrs. ELLA LYMAN CABOT, . . . 1 Marlborough Street, Boston. 
A. LINCOLN FILENE Corner Washington and Sum- 
mer streets, Boston.' 
WALTER V. McDUFFEE, . . .336 Central Street, Spring- 
field. 
THOMAS H. SULLIVAN, .... Slater Building, Worcester. 

Division of Elementary and Secondary Education and Normal Schools. 
FRANK W. WRIGHT, Director. 

Agents. 

CLARENCE D. KINGSLEY, . . . High Schools. 

BURR F. JONES Elementary Schools. 

ROBERT I. BRAMHALL, . . . Research and Statistics. 

HARRY E. GARDNER Registration of Teachers. 

Divisions and Schools under the Department. 

Division of Elementary and Secondary Education and Normal Schools. 

Division' of Vocational Education. 

Division of University Extension. 

Division of Education of Aliens. 

Division of Public Libraries. 

Division of the Blind. 

Teachers' Retirement Board. 

Massachusetts Nautical School. 

Ma--a< in setts Agricultural College. 

Bradford Durfee Textile School, Fall River. 

Lowell Textile School. 

NlW Bedford Textile School. 



FACULTY. 

(Winter Session, 1919-20.) 



\Y. A. lUi.nw i\. B.S., Principal. Educated at Oswego Normal School, Harvard 
University, Cornell University, Chicago University. 

Julia A. Haynes, A.B. Educated at Wellesley College, Marine Biological 
Laboratory, Woods Hole, University of Michigan. 

A\c;ik M. Fauncb, : A.A.G.O. Educated at Boston University and New 
England Conservatory. 

( 11 lblbs 11. Morrill, B.S. Educated at Bridgewater Normal School, Harvard 
University. 

Minerva A. Laing. Educated at Oswego Normal School, Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. 

II wnah M. Harris, Ph.B. Educated at Farmington Normal School, Cornell 
University, University of Pennsylvania. 

A wit; S. Crowell, B.S. Educated at Hyannis Normal School, Harvard 
University, Columbia University. (Substitute, Barbara Webster. Edu- 
cated at Boston School of Physical Education, 1919-20.) 

Bessie E. Goff, B.S. l Educated at Simmons College. 

Katharine C. Cotter, Secretary and Librarian. 

Hyannis Training School. 

William G. Currier, B.H., Principal, grades 8 and 9. Educated at Inter- 
national Young Men's Christian Association College, Hyannis Normal 
School. 

Anastasia McMullen, grades 6 and 7. Educated at Fitchburg Normal 
School. 

Emilie S. Sears, grades 5 and 6. Educated at Hyannis Normal School. 

Carrie B. Dean, grade 4. Educated at Bristol Academy, Hyannis Normal 
School. 

Florence Nichols, grade 3. Educated at Gorham Normal School. 

Bessie A. Morse, grade 2. Educated at Hyannis Normal School. 

Grace V. Rowland, grade 1, Principal, Primary Department. Educated at 
North Adams Normal School. 

West Yarmouth Training School. 

M\ry Clemmey, grades 1 to 4. Educated at Hyannis Normal School. 
Abbie C. Nickerson, grades 7 to 8. Educated at Hyannis Normal School. 

Other Officers. 

Bbbshs E. Goff, Matron of Dormitory. 

Ai.mon L. Mason, Engineer and Janitor. 

Joseph R. Murray, Assistant Engineer and Janitor. 

Robert Murray, x Gardener. 

Jack Huhtanen, Assistant Gardener. 

1 Part-time service. 



FACULTY. 

(First Session of the Double Summer Session, June 29 to 

July 30.) 



List of Subjects and Instructors. 

PSYCHOLOGY, Henrietta V. Race, Instructor in Psychology, Louisville Normal 

School, Louisville, Ky. 
PEDAGOGY, Charles II. Morrill, Instructor, State Normal School, Hyannis. 

Pedagogy will be given in connection with every subject, but it will be 

particularly emphasized in the geography course which will be given by 

Mr. Morrill, who has given the pedagogy for several summers very 

acceptably. 
Project Work with Demonstration Classes for Kindergarten and 

Primary Grades, Ruth Bristol, Supervisor of Kindergartens, Ethical 

Culture School, New York City, assisted by Hazel Swan, Instructor of 

Kindergarten Training class, Worcester, Mass. 
Methods in Primary Reading and Language, Bessie A. Morse, Instructor, 

Training School, Hyannis. 
Methods in Primary Arithmetic, Lena L. Carpenter, First Assistant in 

charge, Margaret Fuller School, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Methods in Citizenship for the First Six Grades, Hannah M. Harris, 

Instructor in History and Social Study, Normal School, Hyannis. 
Methods in Music, Augustus Zanzig, Instructor in Music, Ethical Culture 

School, New York City. 
Methods in Art Instruction, Instructor to be announced. 
Methods in Physical Training and Playground Work, Annie S. Crowell, 

Instructor in Physical Education, State Normal School, Hyannis. 
Project Work and Socialized Recitation Work for Upper Grades, 

Alma McCrumm, Instructor, Lowell Normal School. 
Methods in Junior High School Work, Charles E. Finch, Director of Junior 

High Schools, Rochester, N. Y. 
Method- i\ Community Civics for Junior and Senior High Schools, 

Horace Kidger, Instructor in Civics and History, Newton Technical High 

School, Xewton, Mass. 
Methods in •English for Junior High School Grades, James M. Grainger, 

Instructor in English, State Normal School, Farmville, Va. 
Methods in Geography for Junior High School Grades, Charles H. 

Morrill, Instructor in Geography, State Normal School, Hyannis. 
Methods in Cooking and Sewing for Junior High School Grades, Eliza- 
beth C. Condit, Supervisor of Household Science, Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, 

X. Y. 
Methods in Industrial Work for the Grades, Elizabeth Hoxie, Instructor 

in the New Bedford Anti-Tuberculosis School, New Bedford. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



Methods in School Garden Work, Julia A. Haynes, Instructor in Biology, 
State Normal School, Hyannis. 

Methods in Mental Measurements, Ben Wood, Instructor in mental meas- 
urements and Assistant to Professor Thorndike, Teachers' College, Columbia 
University, New York City. 

Methods in Supervision for Superintendents, Principals and Other 
Supervisory Officers. — First Week, Harvey S. Gruver, Superintendent 
of Schools, Worcester. Second and third weeks, Clarence H. Dempsey, 
Superintendent of Schools, Haverhill. Fourth week, Burr F. Jones, Agent, 
Department of Education. Fifth week, Frank W. Wright, Department 
of Education, Boston. 



FACULTY. 



(Second Session of the Double Summer Session, August 2 to 

September 1.) 



List of Subjects and Instructors. 

America — Americanism — Americanization, An analysis and a considera- 
tion of principles, procedures, and points of view. Charles F. Towne, 
assisted by Charles M. Herlihy and Philip Davis. 
Teaching of Classes for Immigrant Women, Mary Guyton. 
Special lectures will be given by — 

John J. Mahoney, Supervisor of Americanization for the State Department 

of Education. 
Mary A. Mugan, Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Fall River. 
Dennis A. McCarthy, Poet-lecturer. 

G. W. Tupper, Secretary of the State Executive Committee of the Y. M. C. A. 
M. J. Downey, Director of Americanization for the City of Boston. 
Methods in teaching English to the Immigrant will be given if the de- 
mand is sufficient. Instructors to be announced. 
Methods of Instruction in Continuation Schools, Owen D. Evans, 

Director of Boston Continuation Schools, and other instructors. 
Methods in Biology, Julia A. Haynes, Instructor in Biology, State Normal 

School, Hyannis. 
Methods in Art Instruction, Minerva A. Laing, Instructor in Art, State 

Normal School, Hyannis. 
Methods in Geography, Charles H. Morrill, Instructor in Geography, State 

Normal School, Hyannis. 
Psychology, Henrietta V. Race, Instructor in Psychology, Louisville Normal 
School, Louisville, Ky. 



CALENDAR. 



1919. 




Sept . 




Sept. 


10. 




26. 


Deo. 


1. 


Dec. 


19. 


Dec. 


29. 


1920. 




Jan. 


23. 


Jan. 


26. 


Mar. 


26. 


Apr. 


5. 


June 


8-9. 


June 


11. 


June 


29, 


July 


31. 


Aug. 


2, 


Sept. 


1. 


. i 


5-10. 


Sept. 13-14. 


•Sept. 


15. 


Nov. 


24. 


Nov. 


29. 


Dec. 


24. 


1921. 




Jan. 


3. 


Jan. 


28. 


Jan. 


31. 



Monday and Tuesday, second entrance examinations. 

Wednesday, school year begins. 

"Wednesday night, Thanksgiving recess begins. 

Monday night, Thanksgiving recess ends. 

Friday night, Christmas recess begins. 

Monday night, Christmas recess ends. 

Friday night, fall term ends. 

Monday morning, spring term begins. 

Friday night, Easter vacation begins. 

Monday night, Easter vacation ends. 

Tuesday and Wednesday, first entrance examinations. 

Friday, Commencement exercises. 

Summer session (first session) begins. 

Summer session (first session) ends. 

Summer session (second session) begins. 

Summer session (second session) ends. 

Bridgewater conference. 

Monday and Tuesday, second entrance examinations. 

Wednesday, fall term begins. 

Wednesday, Thanksgiving recess begins. 

Monday night, Thanksgiving recess ends. 

Friday, Christmas recess begins. 

Monday night, Christmas recess ends. 

Friday, fall term ends. 

Monday morning, spring term begins. 



State Normal School, 

11 V ANSIs, MASSACHUSETTS. 



THE (APE COD NORMAL SCHOOL. 



CONTINUOUS SESSION. 

Vacations seem desirable and should come once in eight or 
ten weeks, but why should school people take ten or twelve 
weeks of vacation at a time every summer when lawyers, 
doctors and business men are satisfied to get away for a 
week or two? 

At Hyannis an effort is made to build up the physical side 
while encouraging the growth of mind and morals. 

The Hyannis Normal School was established in 1894 and 
received the first class into its regular session in September, 
1897, and the first summer class in July, 1898. Every year 
since the school has been in session during the regular school 
year for thirty-eight weeks, and during the summer session for 
five weeks, or forty-three weeks per year. 

NEW DEPARTURE. 

ginning with the summer of 1920 there is to be a double 
summer session, adding five more weeks to the school year, 
and making it include forty-eight weeks of school work, the 
terms running as follows: — 

Fall term, ..... . September 10 to January 23. 

Spring term, ..... . January 25 to June 11. 

Summer terms: — 

First term, June 29 to July 30. 

ond term, ..... August 2 to September 1. 

This will make a continuous session with brief respites at 
Christmas and Easter time, and before and after the double 
summer session. 



12 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



FLEXIBILITY OF COURSES. 

This arrangement will allow of much flexibility: — 

1. Students may be received in September, January, July 
or August and fit into classes which are then starting. 

2. Students may attend during the fall and spring terms, 
September to June, for two years, and thus secure a two-year 
diploma. 

3. Students may attend during the fall and spring terms 
and the double summer session of the first year, continue 
through the fall term of the second term, then go out and 
teach during the spring term, and return and take the double 
summer session of the second year, thus securing the two-year 
diploma. 

4. Teachers with three years or more of successful experience 
may come for two double summer sessions and the intervening 
fall and spring terms, thus securing a two-year diploma with 
the loss of but one year of teaching. 

5. Teachers of three years or more of successful experience 
who have received some professional training in a reputable 
normal school may receive due credit to count toward a 
diploma. 

Members of the regular normal school faculty take five or 
ten weeks for recreation or study at convenient times during 
the year, and teach during one or both parts of the summer 
session. 

SIMPLE HYGIENIC LIVING. 

The continuous session is not appropriate for any one who 
is not living each day so that he may live the next. 

One of the grave dangers of modern life is the too prevalent 
belief that one may lead an erratic life so long as he balances 
things up some time. He may go without sleep, overwork, 
"burn the candle at both ends'' all through the school year, 
if only he will rest all summer. This belief leads otherwise 
intelligent and conscientious people to excuse in themselves 
all sorts of erratic doings. For instance, they think that 
pressure of work will warrant them in doing without regular 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 13 



physical exorcise for weeks. They excuse themselves for late 
and irregular hours because some conventions in connection 
with a social function demanded extra- time for preparation. 
They think that having labored with their hands in their 
childhood, they need no more of such hard experiences. We 
are striving to correct these false theories, and to build up the 
ideal of a simple, balanced life, to be led as a student and 
later as a teacher. To lead such a life one must plan for it, 
and he needs to plan as carefully for his exercise as for his 
eating and sleeping. He must remember that the soul and 
body are so intimately bound together that whatever affects 
one affects the other. Every day should contain at least one 
and a half hours of productive physical labor, an hour or 
more of play in the open air, ample time for one's meals, 
about eight hours of sleep and about eight hours of mental 
labor. If every teacher would keep about this kind of a 
balance throughout the year, increasing the proportion of 
physical labor and of play on Saturdays and of open-air exer- 
cise on Sundays and holidays, with such modifications as 
climatic changes and differences in personal health demanded, 
he would be stronger physically, clearer in his thinking, more 
sympathetic in his dealings with his fellow men, and he would 
have accomplished much more work at the end of each year; 
and, better still, he would have come to experience in his 
daily life that rare joy which always attends the life of a man 
of simple tastes. "The spirit of the world, the great calm 
presence of the Creator, comes not forth in the sorceries of 
opium or of wine. The sublime vision comes to the pure and 
simple soul in a clean and chaste body." 

INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION EMPHASIZED. 

The small size of the school during the fall and spring terms 
makes possible close contact between instructors and pupils, 
so that sympathetic participation is much in evidence. Then, 
too, the instructors have fewer class recitations and devote 
more time to working with individuals, especially in connection 
with their work in the training school. 



14 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



HYANNIS EDUCATIONAL IDEALS. 

All of the school work is planned with an idea of aiding the 
student to think about his own life, to understand more and 
more of the laws in the physical and social world of which he 
is a part, and to gradually readjust his life in accordance with 
these laws. It is believed that every student who responds 
thoroughly to this kind of education is being prepared in the 
best way to attempt the same kind of educational work with 
young children. 

An opportunity for such application is given during the last 
part of the course, when each student devotes a part of his 
time to practice school work under close supervision. 

THE PRESENT NEEDS OF THE STUDENT THE BASIS. 

We therefore approach the training of teachers from the 
standpoint of the present needs of the student, using present 
experiences as a basis and reason for science, literature and 
art. The selection is made from the standpoint of immediate 
character developing. We are not inclined to change the 
curriculum by cutting out subjects so much as by changing 
the method of approach. We are not inclined to make the 
work less scientific or intensive so much as more practical 
and more a means of real present growth. The tendency has 
been to emphasize each subject per se, as furnishing a special 
kind of information which was to be put into a separate 
pigeonhole. We are trying to select the subject and the part 
of the subject from the standpoint of the present need of the 
growing soul; that which will be assimilated and become a 
very part of the student; that which, on the thought side, 
becomes a generalization or a modification of a generalization, 
— a step in the process of thought development; that which, 
on the feeling side, adds a new interest or a modification of an 
interest, — a step in the process of feeling development; that 
which, on the physical side, helps to build up a strong body, 
to make it more and more amenable to the suggestions of the 
soul; that which, on the side of habit, both physical and 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 15 

mental, helps to replace bad habits by new ones, and such as 
are more in accord with the best thought of modern civilization. 

The Dormitory Life. — The student coming into our dormi- 
tory life finds a group of teachers and fellow students living 
together with much of the family spirit. The food is simple 
hut varied, well cooked and abundant. There is regularity in 
eating, sleeping and study. 

Much attention is paid to the social side of student life, 
especially during the early part of the school year. 

Beside the regular, everyday interchange of amenities com- 
mon in the usual boarding school, much is done in the way 
of simple, informal socials, when the whole school meet on 
Friday night for a frolic. This may take various forms, from 
a quiet progressive game party or an evening when each is 
engaged in some industrial occupation, to a rollicking time 
like a Hallowe'en party in the woods, or a sleighing party 
topped off with maple sugar on snow. 

The life of our students is very full, from the rising hour at 
6.30 to the retiring hour at 10, but the work and play are so 
varied and so intermingled that the students improve in 
health, and are for the most part happy, thoughtful and 
earnest. 

Stages in the Development of the Normal School 

Student. 
The following is a brief statement of the successive stages 
through which the normal school student progresses in each 
subject taken at the normal school: — 

1. The student brings to us varied experiences and habits. 

2. The student comes into an environment which has been 
planned with the purpose of furnishing him with new and de- 
sirable experiences, such that he may subconsciously begin to 
readjust. 

3. As he begins consciously to compare the new with the old 
the teacher comes to his aid, helping to assemble not only his 
own experiences, but, by means of laboratory and books, to 
extend the list, and to use these in thinking toward a gener- 
alization. 



16 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 

4. Care is taken that the thinking shall be so related to the life 
of the student and of society that the right attitude is gained. 

5. If the former steps have been properly taken the student 
is gradually being transformed. 

6. Having been transformed himself, the student next turns 
his attention to the problem of supervising the transformation 
of little children. 

7. He finds that the same steps through which he has passed 
are needed in the development of the young children. 

OPPORTUNITY FOR SELF-HELP. 

Another important feature of our school is the opportunity 
during the regular course to earn and to borrow money. In 
this way a promising student who can bring $55 to pay for the 
board of the first quarter may go through the school without 
much assistance from home. A large per cent of the women 
and all of the men do manual labor in and about the school 
buildings and grounds, thereby earning substantial sums. This 
helps to bring about a fine spirit of sympathy and co-operation 
throughout the school, so that our students are very apt to go 
out into their own schools very thoroughly imbued with the 
spirit of service. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION. 

It is advisable that application be made soon after January 
1, and that certificates be forwarded early in June. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO MASSACHUSETTS 
NORMAL SCHOOLS. 

I. Candidates for admission to a Massachusetts State nor- 
mal school must have attained the age of seventeen years, if 
young men, and sixteen years, if young women (for admission 
to the household arts course at the Framingham Normal 
School, an age of at least eighteen years is required) ; must be 
free from' diseases or infirmities which would unfit them for the 
office of teacher; and must present certificates of good moral 
character. They must also submit "detailed records of scholar- 



STATE NORMAL school AT IDA XX is. 



17 



ship from the principal of the high school, or other school in 
which preparation has been made, showing the amount of time 
given to individual subjects and the grade therein, and such 
additional evidence of qualifications for the calling of a teacher 
as the Department of Education may require. 

II. A candidate for admission as a regular student to a 
general course must present a diploma of graduation from a 
high school, or its equivalent, and, in addition, must offer sat- 
isfactory evidence of preparation in the subjects listed under 
" A," " B " and " ( \" amounting to 14 units, 10 of which units, 
however, must be in subjects given under "A" and "B," 
secured either by examination or certification. A unit repre- 
sents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, con- 
stituting approximately one-quarter of a full year's work. 

A. Prescribed Subjects. — Three units. 



(1) English literature and composition, 



3 units. 



B. Elective Subjects. — At least 7 
subjects: — 



units from the following 



(2) Algebra, 

(3) Geometry, . 

(4) History, 

(5) Community civics, 

(6) Latin, 

(7) French, 

(8) Spanish, 

(9) German, 

(10) Drawing, 

(11) Physics, 

(12) Chemistry, . 

(13) Biology, botany or zoology, 

(14) Physical geography, 

(15) Physiology and hygiene, 

(16) General science, . 

(17) Stenography, 

(18) Manual training, . 

(19) Commercial geography, 

(20) Arithmetic, . 

(21) Bookkeeping, 

(22) Household arts, . 



1 unit. 

1 unit. 

1, 2 or 3 units. 
\ or 1 unit. 

2, 3 or 4 units 

2 or 3 units. 
2 units. 

2 or 3 units. 

\ or 1 unit. 

1 unit. 

1 unit. 

\ or 1 unit. 

\ or 1 unit. 

\ or 1 unit. 

I or 1 unit. 

1 or 2 units 

1 unit. 

\ or 1 unit. 

I or 1 unit. 

1 unit. 

1, 2 or 3 units. 



18 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



For the present, the topics included within the foregoing 
subjects will be such as are usually accepted by Massachusetts 
colleges for entrance. The outlines submitted by the College 
Entrance Examination Board (substation 84, New York City) 
will be found suggestive by high schools. 

C. Additional Subjects. — At least 5 units from any of the 
foregoing subjects, or from other subjects approved by the 
secondary school towards the diploma of graduation of the 
applicant. Work in any subject approved for graduation, in 
addition to that for which credit is secured by examination or 
certification, may count towards these 5 units. 

III. A. Examinations. — Each applicant for admission, 
unless exempted by the provisions of sections IV. and V., 
must pass entrance examinations in the subjects as required 
under "A" and "B." Examinations in these subjects will be 
held at each of the normal schools in June and September of 
each year. Candidates applying for admission by examination 
must present credentials or certificates from their schools to 
cover the requirements under "C," and will not be given 
examinations in these subjects. Persons not able to present 
these credentials must obtain credit for 15 units by examina- 
tions in the subjects listed under "A" and "B." 

B. Division of Examinations. — Candidates for admission 
to a normal school may take all of the examinations at once, 
or divide them between June and September. A candidate 
will receive permanent credit for any units secured by ex- 
amination or certification. Students who have completed the 
work of the third year may present themselves in either June 
or September for examination in five of the ten units included 
under II. B, English excluded. 

IV. Admission on Certificates. — A graduate of a public 
high school approved by the Department of Education for 
purposes of certification to a State normal school may be 
exempted by the principal of the normal school from examina- 
tion in any of the subjects under "A" and "B" in which the 
principal of the high school shall certify that the applicant is 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 19 



entitled to certification in accordance with standards as defined 
by the Department of Education, as follows: — 

A high school in Class A may l certificate 2 to a State normal 
school any graduates in subjects in which they have a mark 
of A or B. 

A high school in Class B may l certificate 2 to a State normal 
school only those graduates who are in the upper half 3 of the 
graduating class, and have attained a mark of A or B in at 
least 10 of the 15 units counted toward graduation from high 
school. 

Credits secured by any candidate from the Board of Regents 
of the State of New York, 'or for admission to any college in 
the New England College Entrance Certificate Board, either 
by examination or certification, or in the examinations of the 
College Entrance Examination Board, either by examination 
or certification, or in the examinations of the College Entrance 
Examination Board, shall be accepted towards the total of 10 
units under "A" and "B." 

In addition to units granted by certification candidates must 
present credentials for subjects under "C." 

V. Admission of Special Students. — (a) When in any nor- 
mal school, or in any course therein, the number of students 
entered as regular students and as advanced students at the 
opening of any school year is below the maximum number for 
which the school has accommodations, the commissioner may 
authorize the admission as a special student of an applicant 
who, being otherwise qualified, and who, having taken the 
entrance examinations, has failed to meet the full requirements 
provided in the regulations of the Department, but who, 

1 The principal of a high school is expected to certificate to a normal school only such 
pupils as are, in his judgment, reasonably likely to succeed in the normal school and in 
teaching. 

2 Candidates whose certificates are accepted by the principal of the normal school are 
exempted from entrance examinations in those subjects in which they have secured in the 
last year of work in that subject a mark of A or B, or a mark upon which the school certificates 
to colleges in the New England College Entrance Certificate Board. 

3 The upper half of a graduating class shall, for this purpose, consist of those pupils who 
have obtained the highest rank as determined by counting for each pupil in the graduating 
class the number of units in which he has secured the mark of B increased by twice the number 
of units in which he has secured the mark of A. 



20 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



nevertheless, is recommended by the principal of the norma] 
school as, in his estimation, qualified to become a teacher. 
Such a special student shall be given regular standing only 
when he shall have satisfied all admission requirements, and 
when his work in the school, in the estimation of the principal, 
justifies such standing. The principal of the normal school 
shall report annually in October to the commissioner as to 
all special students. Certificates may be granted to special 
students, in accordance with regulations approved by the De- 
partment. 

(b) When in any normal school, or in any course therein, 
the number of students entered as regular students, as ad- 
vanced students, and as special students, as defined in (a), at 
the opening of any school year is below the maximum number 
for which the school has accommodations, the commissioner 
may, subject to such special regulations as may be approved 
by the Department, authorize the admission to any class as a 
special student, on the recommendation of the principal, of a 
person possessing special or exceptional qualifications for the 
work of such class. Such special student shall not be considered 
a candidate for a diploma until he shall have qualified as a 
regular student, but may, on the satisfactory completion of 
the work of the course, be granted a certificate to that effect 
by the Department. The principal of the normal school shall 
report annually in October to the commissioner as to all 
special students in the school under the provisions of this 
section. 

VI. Admission as Advanced Students. — A graduate of a 
normal school or of a college, or any person with not less than 
three years' satisfactory experience in teaching, may be ad- 
mitted as a regular or as an advanced student to any course 
under such regulations as may be approved by the Depart- 
ment. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



21 



SCHEDULE OF ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS 

Tuesday, June 8, 1920. 
Morning. 



8.30- 8.45. 
8.45-10.30. 

10.30-11.30. 
11.30-12.30. 



Registration. 
English. 
Geometry. 

Household arts, man- 
ual training. 



Afternoon. 

1.30-2.30. Drawing, stenography. 

2.30-4.00. Latin, arithmetic. 

4.00-5.00. General science, com- 
munity civics, current 
events. 



Wednesday, June 



1920. 



8.15- 8.30. 
8.30-10.00. 

10.00-11.30. 
11.30-12.30. 



Morning. 
Registration. 
French, German, 

Spanish. 
History. 

Physical geography, 
commercial geogra- 
phy. 



Afternoon. 

1.30-2.30. Algebra. 

2.30-3.30. Chemistry, physics. 

3.30—4.30. Physiology, bookkeep- 
ing. 

4.30-5.30. Biology, botany, zool- 
ogy. 



8.30- 8.45. 

8.45-10.30. 
10.30-11.30. 
11.30-12.30. 



Monday, 

Morning. 
Registration. 
English. 
Geometry. 
Household arts, ma 
ual training. 



Sept. 13, 1920. 



1.30-2.30. 
2.30-4.00. 
4.00-5.00. 



Afternoon. 

Drawing, stenograph}'. 

Latin, arithmetic. 

General science, com- 
munity civics, current 
events. 



Tuesday, Sept. 14, 1920. 



8.15- 8.30. 
8.30-10.00. 

10.00-11.30. 
11.30-12.30. 



Morning. 

Registration. 

French, German. 

Spanish. 

History. 

Physical geography, 
commercial geogra- 
phy. 



Afternoon. 
1.30-2.30. Algebra. 
2.30-3.30. Chemistry, physics. 
3.30-4.30. Physiology, bookkeep- 
ing. , 
4.30-5.30. Biology, botany, zool- 

OffV. 



Wednesday, Sept. 15, 1920, 8.15 a.m., normal schools open. 



22 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



PHYSICAL EXAMINATION. 

A physical examination is required of every applicant for 
admission. This examination is sufficiently thorough to afford 
a fair estimate of the health and physique of the candidate. 

CURRICULUM. 







Number 
of Weeks. 


Periods Weekly 


OF — 


Name and Number of Courses. 


Recita- 


Labora- 


Expected 
Outside 






tion. 


tory or 
Teaching. 


Prep- 
aration. 


First Year. 










History and Social Science 1 (Socia 










Study), 


18 


3 


- 


4 


English Language 1 (Composition), 


f 18 
1 18 


2 
2 


- 


2%, 
2Vz 


Literature 1 (Modern English Literature) 


18 


3 


- 


4 


Drawing 1, 


\ 18 
I 18 


2 
3 


- 


2% 
4 


Music 1, 




36 


1 


- 


- 


Music 3 (Chorus), . 




36 


1 


- 


- 


Practical Arts 1 (Euthenics), . 




10 


1 


2% 


- 


Practical Arts 2 (Cooking), 




10 


- 


2V 3 


1 


Practical Arts 3 (Sewing), 




15 


- 


2Vz 


1 


Practical Arts 4 (Woodworking), 




18 


- 


2Yz 


- 


Practical Arts 5 (Reed and Raffia W 


r ork) 


10 


- 


2 


2 


Science 1 (Chemistry), . • 




18 


3 


2Vz 


2 


Science 2 (Physics), 




18 


5 


2Y 3 


m 


Science 3 (Biology), 




36 


2 


2V S 


m 


Science 4 (Minerals), 




18 


2 


2V 3 


m 


Physical Education 1, 




18 


- 


4 




Physical Education 2 (Hygiene), 




18 


3 


2Yz 


2 


Physical Education 3, 




18 


■ 1 


5V 3 


% 


Education 1 (Psychology), 




18 


3 




4 


Education 2 (Pedagogy), 




18 


2 


- 


2% 


Second Year. 










Mathematics 1 (Number Methods), 


10 


2 


- 


2% 


Mathematics 2 (Arithmetic Methods), 


10 


2 


- 


2% 


Geography, 


18 


5 


2Vz 


3H 


History and Social Science 2 (Americar 


L 








History and Civics), . 


18 


4 


- 


SH 


English Language 2 (Primary Reading 










Methods), 


10 


2 


- 


2% 


English Language 3 (Language Methods) 


9 


2 


- 


2 2 A 


English Language 4 (Grammar Schoo 


1 








Reading Methods), 


9 


2 


- 


2% 


English Language 5 (Penmanshit 


) 








Methods), 


10 


1 


- 


m 


Literature 2 (Children's Literature), 


18 


2 


- 


2% 


Drawing 2 (Drawing Methods), 


18 


3 


- 


4 


Music 2, 


18 


1 


- 


- 


Music 3 (Chorus), .... 


36 


1 


- 


- 


Physical Education 4, 


18 


5H 


- 


X A 


Physical Education 5, 


9 


2 


- 


1H 


Physical Education 6, . . . 


18 


H 


1 


Vz 


Education 3 (History of Education), 


18 


3 


- 


4 


Education 4 (School Management), 


18 


2 


- 


2^ 


Practice Teaching, .... 


18 




25 


10 



STATE Xoh'.\f.\L SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 23 



Advanced Courses. 

Whenever students of sufficient promise and number desire 
to go beyond the work of the two years' curriculum a class 
will be formed. 

The aim of the work offered will be to better prepare 
students to do departmental work or to prepare for principal- 
ships and supervisory work. 

MATHEMATICS. 

Mathematics 1. Methods in primary number for teachers in 
elementary schools. Miss Rowland. 

Second year. Ten weeks; two recitation periods weekly; outside prep- 
aration, two and two-thirds periods weekly. 

The aim of this course is to study the methods of teaching arithmetic in the 
primary grades. The principles discussed in class are illustrated in model lessons 
observed in the training school. 

Mathematics 2. Methods in grammar school arithmetic for 
teachers in elementary schools. Miss Crowell. 

Second year. Twelve weeks; two recitation periods weekly; outside 
preparation, two and two-thirds periods weekly. 

The aim of this course is to'point out aims, methods and means of teaching 
arithmetic in grammar grades. Model lessons are observed in the training 
school as a basis for classroom discussions. Much time is devoted to the 
writing of lesson plans and to developing the power to question logically. 

HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE. 

History and Social Science 1. Introductory social study, — a 
course for teachers in elementary schools. Miss Harris. 

First year. Eighteen weeks; three recitation periods weekly; outside 
preparation, average four periods weekly. 

The aims of this course are: (1) To make the student conscious of his own 
relations to the common life of some of the most important social groups of 
which he is a member, — the family, the school, the town, the State; to direct 
his observation of familiar facts of such group life; to enable him, by aid of 
discussion and of reading, to arrive at a few general conclusions whose applica- 
tion will increase his social serviceableness. 

(2) To emphasize the social aims of all education, and to suggest those op- 
portunities and means for realizing this aim which may be found by a teacher 
in the elementary public schools. 



24 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



History and Social Science 2. American history and civics, — a 
course for teachers in elementary schools. Miss Harris. 

Second year. Eighteen weeks; four recitation periods weekly; outside 
preparation, average five and one-third periods weekly. 

The aims of this course are: (1) To increase the student's interest in his 
social and political environment, his understanding of this environment, and 
his capability of reacting healthfully upon it. (2) To suggest ways in which 
the biographical material of history may be utilized in the lower grades to build 
up for the younger children personal ideals, and ways in which both this and 
other material from history may be so chosen and so treated in the upper ele- 
mentary grades as to contribute to the social, especially civic, ideals of the older 
children. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE. 

English Language 1. Course in oral and written composition 
for teachers in elementary schools. Miss Harris and Miss Haynes. 

First year. Thirty-six weeks; two recitation periods weekly; outside 
preparation, average two and two-thirds periods weekly. 

The aim of this course is to train students to think clearly and to express 
their thoughts well in speech and in writing. To this end the concrete ex- 
periences of the pupils, their reading, and other serviceable material will be 
used. 

English Language 2. Methods in primary reading for teachers 
in elementary schools. Miss Rowland. . 

Second year. Ten weeks; two recitation periods weekly; outside prep- 
aration, two and two-thirds periods weekly. 

The aim of this course is to acquaint the class with the best methods of 
teaching reading in the first four grades. Students discuss model lessons ob- 
served in the training school and plan lessons for teaching reading in these 
grades. 

English Language 3. Methods in language work for teachers in 
elementary schools. Miss Harris. 

Second year, first term. Nine weeks; two recitation periods weekly; 
outside preparation, average two and two-thirds periods weekly. 

The following are the subjects discussed: the aims of language work in the- 
elementary schools, the methods suited to this work, its correlation with other 
work and the ground to be covered in each grade. The students prepare plans 
for lessons in the different grades, and these plans are criticized by the class and 
by the instructor. 



sr ATI-: NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 25 



English Language 4. Methods in reading for grammar grades, — 
a course for teachers in elementary schools. Miss Harris. 

Second year. Nine weeks; two recitation periods weekly; outside prep- 
aration, average two and two-thirds periods weekly. 

The attempt is made in this course to show by illustration and by suggestion 
how reading should be taught in the grammar grades. The mental processes 
involved in the act of reading, procedure tending to cultural results, drill re- 
quired for improving technique, and principles governing the selection of reading 
matter are the main phases of the subject which receive attention. 

English Language 5. Methods in penmanship for teachers in 
elementary schools. Miss Morse. 

Second year, first term. Ten weeks; one recitation period weekly; 
outside preparation, one and one-third periods weekly. 

The aims of this course are to give the students power to write neatly and 
legibly upon the blackboard, and to prepare them to teach this subject in the 
public school. 

DRAWING. 

Drawing 1. Introductory course in drawing for teachers in 
elementary schools. Miss Laing. 

First year. Thirty-six weeks; two recitation periods weekly during first 
term and three recitation periods weekly during second term; outside 
preparation, two and two-thirds periods weekly during first term and four 
periods weekly during second term. 

The course aims to give training in ability to see correctly forms and colors 
and to express in drawing what is seen; to lead the student to appreciate relation 
of beauty and fitness; to develop taste (and aesthetic judgment) in the use of 
colors, of textures and in design; and to lead to a keener appreciation of mani- 
festations of harmony in color or form in life. 

Drawing 2. Method course for teachers in elementary schools. 
Miss Lain*,. 

Second year, first term. Eighteen weeks; three recitation periods 
weekly; outside preparation, four periods weekly. 

This course aims to instruct students in methods of teaching each of the 
several aspects of drawing in the elementary grades. It includes, also, practice 
in blackboard sketching and the planning and working out of several forms of 
constructive work adapted to use in the elementary grades. 



26 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



MUSIC. 

Music 1. Methods in music for teachers in elementary schools. 

Miss Faunce. 

First year. Thirty-six weeks; one recitation period weekly. 

Music 2. Methods in music for teachers in elementary schools. 

Miss Faunce. 

Second year, first term. Eighteen weeks; one recitation period weekly. 

The object of Courses 1 and 2 is to give students confidence and therefore 
greater efficiency in their class work by acquiring (1) accurate knowledge of 
the subject-matter; (2) the ability to do themselves what they will require of 
their pupils; (3) more critical judgment, by means of which they will be able 
to recognize and correct errors; (4) a practical command of methods. 

Music 3. Chorus singing by the whole school. Miss Faunce. 
First and second years. Seventy-two weeks; one recitation period 
weekly. 

PRACTICAL ARTS. 

Practical Arts 1 (Euthenics). Introductory household arts course 
for teachers in elementary schools. Miss Goff. 

First year. Ten weeks; one recitation period weekly; outside prepara- 
tion and practice, average two and two-thirds periods weekly. 

The aim of this course is to help our students to a practical realization of the 
best methods of keeping their dormitory rooms and conveniences and school 
rooms clean, neat and orderly. 

Practical Arts 2. Cooking course for teachers in the elementary 
schools. Miss Goff. 

First year. Ten weeks; two and one-third laboratory periods weekly; 
outside preparation, average one period weekly. 

The aim of this course is to acquaint our students with the basic principles 
of cookery, and to apply these principles to the cooking of such foods as are in 
common use in the home. Part of the time is devoted to the consideration of 
methods of teaching cooking in the grades of rural schools. 

Practical Arts 3. Sewing course for teachers in elementary 
schools. Miss Goff. 

First year, second term. Fifteen weeks; two and one-third laboratory 
periods weekly; outside preparation, average one period weekly. 

The aim of this course is to prepare teachers for teaching sewing in the grades 
of the elementary schools. Students are required to make certain types of 
practical articles adaptable to grade work. The students consider methods of 
teaching sewing as well as the actual sewing. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 27 



Practical Arts 4. Manual tiairiing course for teachers in ele- 
mentary schools. Mr. Morrill. 

First year. Eighteen weeks; two and one-third laboratory periods 
weekly; no outside preparation. 

The aim of this course is to acquaint the students with the common tools 
used in woodworking, the use of working drawings, the preparation and finish 
of woods, with some suggestions as to the principles which shall determine the 
kind of work done in elementary grades. 

Practical Arts 5. Methods in handwork, such as weaving, ham- 
mock making, cane seating, reed and raffia work, etc., for teachers 
in elementary schools. 

First year. Ten weeks; two laboratory periods weekly; outside prep- 
aration, about two periods weekly. 

The aim of this course is to train teachers to deal properly with manual work 
appropriate for the elementary schools. 



SCIENCE. 

Science 1. Content and method course in chemistry for teachers 
in elementary schools. Miss Laing. 

First year, first term. Eighteen weeks; three recitation periods weekly; 
two and one-third laboratory periods weekly; outside preparation, two 
periods weekly. 

The aim of the course is to. lead the student, through study of chemical action 
observed in his every-day life, as combustion in its relation to lighting and heat- 
ing, fermentation and the action of acids and bases in their relation to cooking, 
etc., to an interpretation of chemical law; to lead him to formulate chemical 
principles and to apply them in meeting the needs of his life as student and 
teacher. 

Science 2. Physics course for teachers in elementary schools. 

Mr. Morrill. 

First year, second term. Eighteen weeks; five recitation periods weekly; 
two and one-third laboratory periods weekly; outside preparation, three 
and one-third periods weekly. 

The aim of this course is to explain phenomena of every-day life, to give a 
reasonable basis for facts met in other subjects and in the life of the elementary 
school, and to acquaint the student with scientific reasoning for his own cultural 
development. 



28 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



Science 3. Biology for teachers in elementary schools. Miss 
Haynes. 

First year. Thirty-six weeks; two recitation periods weekly; two and 
one-third field or laboratory periods weekly; outside preparation, one and 
one-third periods weekry. 

The aim of this course is to make students acquainted with the living things 
about them in such a way as to broaden their sympathies, to make their own 
lives richer, and to increase their helpfulness as members of the community in 
which they live. The course is at once cultural and practical. Throughout the 
year there is constant study of plants and animals in their natural surroundings, 
or living under practically normal conditions in garden and laboratory. Vege- 
table and flower gardens are made; the relation of birds, insects, weeds and fun- 
gous diseases to man is studied. The students collect, clean and test seeds, 
spray, prune and graft trees, and take an active part in the control of insect 
pests of the shade and forest trees of the town. Methods are studied throughout 
the course. 

Science 4. Content and method course in minerals for teachers 
in elementary schools. Miss Laing. 

First year, second term. Eighteen weeks; two recitation periods weekly; 
two and one-third laboratory or expedition periods weekly; outside prep- 
aration, one and one-third periods weekly. 

The course purposes to further the natural interest of the student in the min- 
erals most nearly related to his life; to lead to an intelligent appreciation of the 
industrial importance of minerals; to supplement school garden work by study 
of soils in their relation to minerals, and of soil conditions favorable to plant 
growth; and to lead the student to observation of surface forms and to interpre- 
tation of them as the result of such dynamic forces as frost, running water, 
wind, etc. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

Physical Education 1. Introductory course in physical training 
for teachers in elementary schools. Miss Crowell. 

First year, first term. Eighteen weeks; four exercise periods weekly. 

The aim of this course is to acquaint students with forms of formal gymnas- 
tics, folk-dancing, games and sports that are suitable for use in elementary 
schools. Much of the work is done out of doors. 

Physical Education 2. Course in hygiene for teachers in ele- 
mentary schools. Miss Crowell. 

First year, first term. Eighteen weeks; three recitation periods weekly; 
two and one-third laboratory periods weekly; outside preparation, two 
periods weekly. 

The aim of this course is to help students to interpret their own experiences 
through a study of the structure and functions of the human body and to apply 
their knowledge to every-day living. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 21) 



Physical Education 3. Preliminary course in methods in physi- 
cal training for teachers in elementary schools. Miss Crowbll. 

First year, second term. Eighteen weeks; one recitation period weekly; 
five and one-third exercise periods weekly; outside preparation, two-thirds 
of a period weekly. 

The aim of this course is to point out the values of various forms of physical 
training, and to train students in the technique of leading groups of people in 
formal gymnastics, folk-dancing and games. Practice in teaching fellow students 
i< provided. 

Physical Education 4. Methods in physical training for teachers 
in elementary schools. Miss Crowell. 

Second year, first term. Eighteen weeks; five and one-third periods 
weekly: outside preparation, average one-fourth of a period weekly. 

The aim of this course is to direct students in observation and practice in 
teaching children gymnastics, folk-dancing and games. Students observe the 
work of the regular teachers in the training school and assist in teaching. 

Physical Education 5. Methods in hygiene for teachers in ele- 
mentary schools. Miss Crowell. 

Second year, second half of first term. Nine weeks; two recitation 
periods weekly; outside preparation, one and one-third periods weekly. 

The aim of this course is to help students to see ways in which the public 
school may influence the health of children, and to plan how to inspire and en- 
courage children to practice various phases of hygienic living. 

Physical Education 6. Course in playground supervision for 
teachers in elementary schools. Miss Crowell. 

Second year, second term. Eighteen weeks; one recitation period fort- 
nightly; two playground periods fortnightly. 

The aim of this course is to point out the possibilities of play as a form of 
training, and to give actual practice in playground work. 



EDUCATION. 

Education 1. Introductory course in educational psychology 
for teachers in elementary schools. Mr. Baldwin. 

First year, first term. Eighteen weeks; three recitation periods weekly; 
outside preparation, four periods weekly. 

The aim of this course is to aid students to understand the more obvious 
mental activities, and thus to give them a basis for the study and practice of 
modern pedagogy. 



30 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



Education 2. Course in pedagogy for teachers in elementary 
schools. Mr. Baldwin. 

First year, second term. Eighteen weeks; two recitation periods weekly; 
outside preparation, two and two-thirds periods weekly. 

The aim of this course is to help the student to understand what is meant by- 
method, and how the proper method always grows out of the natural relations 
which exist between the development of the human mind and the study of the 
subject under consideration. 

Education 3. Course in history of education for teachers in 
elementary schools. Mr. Baldwin. 

Second year, first term. Eighteen weeks; three recitation periods 
weekly; outside preparation, four periods weekly. 

The aim of this course is to review the principles of psychology and pedagogy 
and to give to them additional emphasis, breadth and strength by giving them 
an historical setting and by connecting their development with the evolution 
of human thought. 

Education 4. Course in school management for teachers in 
elementary schools. Mr. Baldwin. 

Second year, second term. Eighteen weeks; two recitation periods 
weekly; outside preparation, two periods weekly. 

The aim of this course is to aid the students to understand the principles un- 
derlying the school management which is being applied, both in the normal 
school and in the training school, and how they may apply these same prin- 
ciples in their own schools. 

LITERATURE. 

Literature 1. Course in modern English and American literature 
for teachers in elementary schools. Miss Harris. 

First year, first term. Eighteen weeks; three recitation periods weekly; 
outside preparation, average four periods weekly. 

The aim of this course is to increase the student's appreciation, not only of 
books, but also of certain aspects of nature and of life whose realization is be- 
lieved to be cultural in the deeper sense of the word. These aspects have been 
forcefully or attractively dwelt upon in the work of some modern authors whose 
appeal to the interest of young men and women is vital, but who have written 
also for children. About one-third of the time is spent on this literature for 
children. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 31 



Literature 2. Course in children's literature. Miss Harris. 
Second year, second term. Eighteen weeks; two recitation periods 
weekly; outside preparation, average two and two-thirds periods weekly. 

The aim of tins course is to make the young teacher not only acquainted at 
the outset with a considerable body of children's literature, but also able to 
selecl wisely the additional literature that new occasions will demand. 

GEOGRAPHY. 

Geography. Methods course for teachers in elementary schools. 

Mr. Morrill. 

'itd year. Eighteen weeks; five recitation periods weekly; two and 
one-third laboratory periods weekly; outside preparation, three and one- 
third periods weekly. 

The aim of this course is to give the student a knowledge of elementary laws 
of physiography, and acquaint him with the best methods of teaching geog- 
raphy in the elementary schools. 



PRACTICE TEACHING. 

Practice Teaching. Observation and teaching in the practice 
school, for teachers in elementary schools. 

Second year, second term. Eighteen weeks; about twenty-five recita- 
tion periods weekly; outside preparation, about ten periods weekly. 

The aims are to furnish students illustrations of good teaching, and to train 
these students in planning and giving lessons to children for whose welfare they 
are temporarily responsible, and in all of those details which are necessary in a 
good school. 

STUDENTS' LOAN FUND. 

This fund shall, so far as practicable, be used to loan, in 
such sums and to such students of the State normal school at 
Hyannis as the trustees may, after careful investigation, con- 
sider proper recipients of such loans. 

The personal note of the pupil receiving the loan, with or 
without indorsement, payable in five years or less, with interest 
at 4 per cent, shall be taken and held by the trustees. 



32 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANXJS. 



STATE AID. 

The State appropriates $4,000 per annum for the normal 
schools, which is given to promising pupils who are unable, 
without assistance, to meet all their expenses; but no one re- 
ceives such assistance till the second term of the course. 

Any one desiring to obtain assistance through the students' 
loan fund or the State aid fund should apply to the principal 
of the school for the proper blanks. 

GUSTAVUS HINCKLEY FUND. 

The income from the Gustavus Hinckley Fund is now avail- 
able, and is being used to aid promising students who need 
such assistance. 

FREE TUITION. 

Residents of Massachusetts declaring their intention to teach 
in the State will not be required to pay tuition; but each pupil 
from another State shall pay at the beginning of each half-year 
session the sum of $25 for the use of the school. 

BOARDING HALL. 

Non-resident students are expected to board in the dormi- 
tory or in private families approved by the principal. 

The State has erected, furnished and keeps in repair this 
fine building without expense to the students; all money paid 
for board is therefore expended for provisions and service; thus 
first-class accommodations and excellent board are furnished at 
a very low rate. The cost to students for the current school 
year ending June 11, 1920, is $220 for the school year of 
forty weeks. Board is payable quarterly, in advance, i.e., $55 
at the beginning of each ten weeks of the school year. 

The cost of provisions is so uncertain that it does not seem 
wise to promise that this rate will be continued -during the 
coming school year. It is, however, safe to say that only 
such increase will be made as is demanded by the increased 
cost of food. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT II V ANN IS. 33 



FURNITURE. 

Each boarder is expected to furnish bedding, towels, nap- 
kins and napkin ring and clothes bag. It will be well for 
each to bring four pillow cases, three sheets, two blankets and 
one coverlet. Every article of clothing must be distinctly 
and indelibly marked with the owner's name. 

OTHER EXPENSES. 

Textbooks and reference books are loaned to the students 
free of charge, but they are expected to pay for any damage to 
books or furniture which they may be using, to buy their own 
paper and notebooks and to pay for breakage in the laboratory 
work. The total of such expenses for a year is only a few 
dollars. 

THE PLAN FOR STUDENT PARTICIPATION IN THE GOV- 
ERNMENT OF THE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT 
HYANNIS, ADOPTED BY THE SCHOOL IN THE FALL 
OF 1918. 

A student council shall be the representative body, chosen 
from the student body, acting with the principal and faculty 
in suggesting rules and regulations, and aiding in any way to 
make the school more efficient in all its activities. 

The council shall consist of a student from each floor of the 
dormitory, one from those living outside of the dormitory, and 
one chosen by the faculty. A chairman and a secretary shall 
be chosen by the council from its members. 

The council shall be chosen at the beginning of the fall term 
and the beginning of the spring term. 

The council shall meet once in two weeks by notice from 
the chairman. Every third meeting shall be held with the 
principal. Special meetings may be called by the chairman or 
the principal of the school. 

Rules and regulations shall be drawn by the council at the 
beginning of each school year. 



34 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 

Any rules or regulations drawn by the council shall be sub- 
mitted to the faculty, and if approved shall then be submitted 
to the student body. A majority vote of the school puts the 
rule into force. Rules may be amended by a two-thirds vote 
of the school. 

Rules and Regulations drawn up by the Council on 
Sept. 24, 1918. 

1. There shall be a study hour on Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday evenings. For the present it shall 
be from 7 to 9.30 p.m. 

2. The dormitory shall be quiet at 10 p.m., and all its 
lights shall be out at 10.15 p.m. 

3. The piano or other musical instruments shall not be 
played between the hours of 2.30 and 5 p.m. on Sundays. 
During other hours music shall be played that is in keeping 
with the day. 

4. Students shall not leave their own rooms during study 
hour, except as is absolutely necessary. 

5. A chairman for each of the standing committees shall be 
chosen from the council by the council members. The chair- 
man shall be permitted to choose two assistants from the 
student body, and may ask for any advice from the faculty. 

Amendments by the School, Jan. 2, 1919. 

Whereas, We realize that we are here for education, and 
that education means progress, — progress, too, in many lines 
of thought and activity not included in classroom work, — 
and whereas we recognize that we can best approach our ideal 
through the combined efforts of the entire school family; 
therefore be it — 

Resolved, That we make the following amendments to the 
plan for student government already in effect: — 

1. In addition to the student council as constituted, there 
shall be elected by the council an advisor from the faculty 
who shall meet with the council and take an active part in 
all the work of the council, including that of its subcommittees. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 35 



This advisor shall bo elected within one week of the election 
of the council to serve for one term, and shall not be re-elected 
in the same school year. 

2. The council shall appoint the following committees to 
consist in each ease of a chairman who is a member of the 
council and two other students: — 

(a) A social committee, which shall assist in all that relates 
to making the social life of our school helpful and agreeable 
and to increasing the social accomplishments of its members. 

(b) An athletic committee, which shall assist in the athletic 
interests of the school. 

(c) A housekeeping committee, which shall assume the 
responsibility of seeing that the school building and the 
dormitory parlors are kept attractive and homelike. 

3. In order that there may be a closer bond between the 
faculty and the student body, the student body shall be 
divided by lot into five groups. The men of the school shall 
form one group to meet with one of the men teachers. Each 
group shall have its faculty member, who shall also be chosen 
by lot. These groups and their members from the faculty 
shall be chosen every term. They shall meet at least once a 
month, at a time and place decided upon by the group. 

These meetings shall be very informal, and shall be for the 
purpose of freely discussing all matters relative to the im- 
provement of school conditions and personal characteristics. 

Further, it is hoped that out of this association there may 
grow helpful personal conferences between individuals and 
their group advisor. 

THE SCHOOL A FAMILY. 

A plan is being gradually evolved by which most of the 
domestic work of the school is done by the teachers and 
students. Each person takes care of his own room at the 
dormitory. Some of the students wait on the table, wash 
dishes, clean floors and do other w r ork similar in character. 
These receive compensation in accordance with the amount of 
work performed. 



36 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS 



THE SCHOOL AND THE PUBLIC. 

The school holds itself in readiness to respond to calls from 
the superintendents and teachers of the vicinity for any assist- 
ance which it can render. It welcomes all interested visitors 
to its sessions or to inspect its equipment. Rooms are gladly 
provided for teachers' meetings and for lectures which are of 
a distinctly educational value. 

For particulars regarding the regular or summer sessions, 
address the principal. 

DOUBLE SUMMER SESSION, 1920. 

Purpose. — To meet the needs of the teachers of an evolving 
Democracy. 

Every person engaged in education needs to be continually 
readjusting. 

New occasions teach new duties; Time makes ancient good uncouth; 
They must upward still, and onward, who would keep abreast of Truth. 

In 1919 the number of students in attendance was more than 
double that of 1918. Nearly every student promised to return 
in 1920 and to induce one or two others to come. This, with 
an increased demand for teachers in Americanization and the 
new law compelling the establishment of continuation schools, 
seems to warrant the expectation that the attendance for 1920 
will be much larger than in 1919. 

For this and other reasons which will be stated later it has 
been decided to offer a double summer session consisting of 
two five-week sessions. The work of the first session, June 
29 to July 30, will be similar in character to that of former 
summer sessions. The second session will be devoted mainly 
to courses in Americanization and methods in continuation 
schools. 

Teachers now in service who have not a Massachusetts 
normal school diploma will find courses planned especially to 
meet their needs in both sections of the summer session. 







? 




- fi^zr--^] 


,___j 











STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNJS. 37 

A course In the Theory and Practice of Teaohing House- 
hold Arts in State-aided schools, and a course in Methods 
for Evening Practical Arts, will be given from July 12 to 
Aimnst 20. 

The work in psychology and pedagogy, txnd in primary 
methods, will be closely related to the work done by the 
children in the demonstration classes. 

A limited number of experienced primary school teachers 
will be registered for observation, teaching and conferences in 
connection with our demonstration classes. 

The work here offered is so varied that teachers of all grades 
from the kindergarten to college, teachers of special schools, 
and supervisors and superintendents of schools may each and 
all find work adapted to their needs, and get into touch with 
the latest in pedagogy. 

It is usually more satisfactory not to try to arrange the 
details of one's program before arrival at Hyannis, unless one 
has been a member of the school in former summers. 

Each of the regular courses here offered requires two forty- 
five-minute recitation periods each school day and two or more 
hours of stud}'. The recitation period is devoted mainly to 
discussions participated in by students and teacher. Earnest 
students are thus guided in their thinking and study so that 
they are glad to spend many hours upon the preparation work. 

We earnestly advise each student to take such a program 
that he may spend his forenoons and evenings in study and 
devote the whole or a large part of the afternoons to sailing, 
bathing or frolics on the beach; or to tramping, bicycling or 
automobiling over the attractive, well-kept roads. 

Expenses. 

Tuition will be free to all who live in the State or w T ho 
teach in the State; to others the nominal fee of $10 will be 
charged for the five weeks of each session. 

Use of books and equipment of the school will be free. 

Books, paper and laboratory materials will be furnished at 
cost. Materials for industrial work and sewing will be some- 



38 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



what greater than for other supplies, with the understanding 
that articles made become the property of the student. 

Board and furnished room, with heat and light (no personal 
washing), two single beds in each room, at the dormitory, $40 
for the session. Board without room, $35 for the session. 



Other Information. 

Any student occupying a room at the dormitory is expected 
to bring sheets for single bed, pillow cases, towels, napkins, 
clothes-bag and napkin ring. Students are expected to care 
for their own rooms. 

Rooms at the dormitory are all engaged, and there is a long 
waiting list. Table board may be had. A limited number of 
those who cannot secure rooms at the dormitory may be 
accommodated in tent-houses in the field adjoining and take 
their meals at the dormitory. The charge for one of these 
tent-houses is $20 for the session, and each house must be 
occupied by two people and may be occupied by three or four, 
the expense to be divided among those who occupy the house. 

The people of Hyannis have the reputation of being very 
cordial to the members of the summer session. Many of them 
open their houses and rent their rooms at a reasonable rate. 
Those teachers who have been here before often engage their 
rooms in advance. For those who are new it is usually more 
satisfactory to come early and to select a room after seeing it. 
Furnished rooms in the village cost from $1.50 to $5 per week. 

A colony of twenty-four tent-houses is located on high 
ground at the bathing beach. These houses are made of wood 
except for windows at the sides, which are covered with cloth. 
These tent-houses are comfortably furnished for light house- 
keeping. The price of these tent-houses at the beach is as 
follows: — 



Single house, per season, .... 


. $30 


Single house, per session, .... 


. 25 


Single house, per week, .... 


5 


Double house, per season, .... 


. 60 


Double house, per session, 


. 50 


Double house, per week, .... 


. 10 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 39 



Applicants desiring the tent-houses at the beach are advised 
to apply as early as possible. Preference will be given to in- 
structors and superintendents with their families. 

Registration and assigning of rooms and boarding places 
will occur on Monday, June 28. School opens at 8 a.m. on 
Tuesday, June 29. 

It seems desirable to have it understood by all who con- 
template attending this school that it is a real school estab- 
lished and supported by the State for the professional training 
of those who are now or expect to be teachers or superin- 
tendents in the State. It is, in fact, a State normal school, 
and is administered on that basis. 

Students are expected to conform to such simple regulations 
as seem to the student body and the faculty desirable for the 
proper management of the school. A few regulations have 
been found necessary in connection with the dormitory, so 
that those who desire to study evenings may have some 
quiet, uninterrupted hours for the same. 

Character of the Work. 

The work will be like the regular work of the school year. 
The same amount of study, of lecture room and of laboratory 
time will be required in each subject. 

Students may take one or two subjects, but the work must 
be intensive in each. 

The work is so planned that it is not possible to take more 
than two of the heavier subjects, and students are earnestly 
advised to take but one. 

Credits allowed. 

Due credits will be allowed for work which has been done in 
other normal schools or in colleges. 

Teachers in service may be allowed to offer their experience 
between the successive summer sessions in lieu of practice in 
the training school. 



40 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



Diplomas granted. 

Credit will be given for each subject that is satisfactorily 
completed. A diploma will be awarded when the amount of 
work done by the student is equal to that required in the 
regular course. 

The time required for earning a diploma will depend upon 
the former preparation and upon the amount and character of 
work in this school. 

Admission. 

Superintendents, supervisors and teachers of maturity who 
have been in service for two or more years, and graduates of 
four-year courses in high schools who have taught one year, 
will be admitted without examination. 

Graduates of high schools and teachers of less than the 
aboA^e required experience who desire to teach in the State 
may be admitted without examination, but without entrance 
examinations cannot be assured that they will receive credit to 
count toward a diploma. 

For list of instructors and courses, see Summer Session 
Facultv. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT IIYANNIS. 



41 



LIST OF STUDENTS, REGULAR SESSION. 



Seniors. 



Atkins, Mary, . 

. Lillian M., 
Bond, Alice E., 
Burns, Ethel M., . 
Doane, Edna R., . 
Eldridge, Helen V., 
Lema, Mary E., 
Madeiros, Charlotte, 
Riedell, Christine C, 
Warner, Marjorie A., 



Pleasant Lake. 

Fairhaven. 

Hyannis. 

Norwell. 

South Orleans. 

Chatham. 

Provincetown. 

Edgartown. 

North Plymouth. 

South Yarmouth. 



Juniors. 



Bacon, Gertrude, . 
Francis, Marguerite, 
Gardner, Ruth, 
Gomes, Anna, . 
Hamblin, Forest C 
Henderson, Frank, 
Higgins, Katharine K. 

. Catherine B. 
Lewis, Myrtle L., 
Morris, Mary, 
Xickerson, Abbie F 
Xickerson, Madge E 
Peak, Phyllis E., 
Perry, Xora, 
Phillips, Bertha M. 
Prince, Helen B., 



Hyannis. 

Yarmouthport. 

Apponaug, R. I. 

Tiverton, R. I. 

Marstons Mills. 

Provincetown. 

Marstons Mills. 

Provincetown. 

Centerville. 

Provincetown. 

Eastham. 

East Harwich. 

Hyannis. 

Provincetown. 

Harwichport. 

Franklin. 



42 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



Specials. 

Dean, Beatrice, Fairhaven. 

Flocken, Robert H., . . ' . . . Taunton. 

Freeman, Faustina, Provincetown. 

Holliday, J. W., West Dennis. 

Huber, Wesley G., Hyannis. 

Jason, Justin F., Provincetown. 

Little, Mildred L. M., Providence, R. I. 

Littlefield, Mildred, Foxborough. 

Lowney, Cecilia, Somerset. 

Lumiansky, Rebecca, New Bedford. 

Smith, Priscilla D., Hyannis. 

Ward, Sarah N., Amherst. 

Williams, Eva H., Hyannis. 

Samperio, Arthur H., Mexico. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



43 



SUMMER SESSION STUDENTS, 1919. 



Adams, Aroline W.. 

Adams, Emily F., . 
Adams, Helen B., . 
Adams. Ida May, 
Albisetti, Josephine M., 
Aldrich, Ruth M., . 
Ambler, Miriam L., 
Ames, Augusta R., 
Andrew, Pauline M., 
Annis, Lilla L., 
Austin. Mary K., . 
Aver, Dorothy M., 
Baird, Jean F., 
Baldwin, Fred H., . 
Baldwin, Lena Marguerite, 
Bancroft, Grace L., 
Barker, Mary H., . 
Barrett, Ellen De S., 
Barron, Frances E., 
Bartlett, Edith P., . 
Bartlett, Helen M., 
Bates, Viva L., 
Beard, Edith H., . 
Beatty, Elizabeth, . 
Belding, Alice H., . 
Bemis, Clara L., 
Bemis, Xettie M., . 
Bennett, Lydia A., 
Berglund, Alvina L., 
Black, Florence K., 
Bodwell, Marion I., 



Vt. 



Salem. 

Weston. 

Waltham. 

Revere. 

Barre, Vt. 

Plymouth, 

Natick. 

Rockland. 

Hadley. 

Buckfield, Me. 

Dorchester. 

Winchester. 

Oak Bluffs. 

South Dennis. 

South Dennis. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Newburyport. 

Cambridge. 

Marshfield Hills. 

Nantucket. 

Huntington. 

Natick. 

Bridge water. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Haverhill. 

Leonia, N. J. 

Rehoboth. 

Beverly. 

Methuen. 



44 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



Boice, Hazel M., Brookline. 

Boland, Frances L., Pittsfield. 

Boothby, Lona E., Portland, Me. 

Boynton, Alice B., West Newbury. 

Breen, Delia M., Worcester. 

Briggs, Rita F., Keene, N. H. 

Brooks, May L., Worcester. 

Bruce, Rachel S., Fitchburg. 

Bryant, Mildred C, . . . . . Brockton. 

Bryn, Elisabeth S., Plainfield. 

Burckes, Anna W., Waltham. 

Burdett, Helen H., Keene, N. H. 

Burpee, Ethel T., Boston. 

Butler, Anna A., Lynn. 

Butler, Olive, Boston. 

Buzzell, Enid L., Bridgewater. 

Buzzell, Gladys M., Bridgewater. 

Cahill, Esther E., Allston. 

Callahan, Julia F., Lynn. 

Cannon, Esther M., Dorchester. 

Capron, Lillian M., Springfield. 

Carpenter, Mary E., Spencer, 

Carr, Alice G., Woburn. 

Chapin, Mary I., Boston. 

Chase, Melissa, ■ . Beverly. 

Chase, Sarah M., Brookline. 

Chevigny, Elizabeth M., . . . . Montello. 

Child, Susan E., Brockton. 

Clark, Alice, Bridgewater. 

Cleary, Mary T., . . . . . . Cambridge. 

Clifford, Delia M., Lynn. 

Cochran, Margaret, Milford. 

Cohen, Betty B., Cambridge. 

Coleman, Anna C, Troy. 

Coleman, Grace A., Worcester. 

Collamore, Edna A., Worcester. 

Connell, Catherine G., . . . . . Worcester. 

Connolly, Mary A. E., Boston. 

Connors, Elizabeth P., Watertown. 

Connors, Mary A., Brookline. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



45 



9on, Carrie M., . 

grove, Margaret L,, 

ffey, Frances 1'., 
Crouse, Anna L., . 
Crowell, .Joseph E., 
("ruse. Prances, 
Currier, William G., 
Curtis, Ruth M., . 
gle, Ellen C, . 
Dagle, Evelyn C, . 
Daisy, Mildred K., 
Dalton, Maude E.. 
Dame. Rosetta F., . 
Davis, Mary, . 
Dean, Beatrice, 

a, Clara R., 
Dean, Mary E., 
Deane, Bertha L., . 
Delano, Lovicy M., 
Denny, Thomas J., 
I tesmond, Elizabeth L. ; 
Devine, Agnes, 
Donald>on, M. S., . 
Dorman, Alice M., 
Driscoll, Anna F., . 
Duffin, Rose, . 
Dunnells, Clifford W., 
Dwyer, Mary M., . 
Eberhardt, Alice H., 
Elkins, A. L., . 
Elliott, Eleanor, 
Annie E., 
Farwell, Mable S., . 
Fernandes, Margaret, 
Fernandes, Marie, . 
Fisher, Mattie L., . 
Flagg, Helen V., 
Fogg, Harriet M., . 

Agnes G., 
Fox, Marguerite A., 



Lynn. 

Dorchester. 

Westborough 

Weston. 

West Dennis. 

South Easton 

Hyannis. 

Bridgewater. 

Gloucester. 

Gloucester. 

Fitchburg. 

Norwood. 

Lakeport, N. 

Clinton. 

Fairhaven. 

Revere. 

Revere. 

Woodmere 

Marion. 

Hyannis. 

Harvard. 

Bridgewater. 

Brockton. 

Somerville. 

Whitinsville. 

Lowell. 

Andover. 

Brighton. 

Needham. 

Haverhill. 

Bridgewater. 

Westborough. 

Worcester. 

New Bedford. 

New Bedford. 

Westborough. 

Mansfield. 

Attleboro. 

Salem. 

Mansfield. 



I! 



L. I. 



46 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



Franklin, Grace, Attleboro. 

French, Edward S., Reading. 

French, E. Dora, Reading. 

Gallup, Gladys A., Springfield, Vt. 

Gammans, Harold W., Brookline. 

Gammons, Ruth M., Bridge water. 

Gardner, Adaline A., Somerville. 

Garrity, Marguerite M., .... Abington. 

Gately, Mary M., Cambridge. 

Gilderdale, Maude C., Colrain. 

Gilmore, Cecilia G., Peabody. 

Glancy, Mary E., Needham. 

Glass, Mable E., Silver Lake. 

Goodspeed, Madge L., Worcester. 

Gorman, Katherine A., Providence, R. I. 

Gorman, Mary A., Providence, R. I. 

Goward, Marian C, North Easton. 

Grainger, Mary E., Knoxville, Tenn. 

Graves, Alice M., Presque Isle, Me. 

Gray, Myrtle A., Townsend Harbor. 

Greer, Jeanette, New Bedford. 

Hadley, Mary A., Templeton. 

Hall, Helen M., Orleans. 

Hall, Henry W., Falmouth. 

Hallett, Evelyn W., Detroit, Mich. 

Hammond, Adelaide P., .... Worcester. 

Hammond, Grace DeWolfe, .... Haverhill. 

Hannigan, Margaret E., .... Brockton. 

Hannigan, Winnifred G., New Bedford. 

Harmon, Lou M., . . . . * . . Ashfield. 

Harney, Marion, Framingham. 

Harrod, Warren K., Worcester. 

Hastings, Elsie A., Westborough. 

Hawes, Edna F., Winchester. 

Hayes, Eliza P., . . . . Edgewood, R. I. 

Hedberg, Agnes H., Maiden. 

Herlihy, Mary E., New Bedford. 

Hickey, Rose M., Cambridge. 

Hickok, Jesse E., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Higgins, Alice C, Woburn. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



47 



Sinchcliffe, Priscilla G., 
Bofman, Hazelfern, 
Homer, Sadie V., . 

m. Nellie C, . 
Horton, Esther H., 
Boeie, Basel J., 
Hoeie, Helen M., . 
Howe, Elisabeth A., 
Howlett, AbbieM., 
Hoxie, Luqy, . 
Huber, Wesley G., . 
Hurley, Helen V., . 
Ingalls, Inez F., 
Ingalls, Irene H., . 
Johnson, Dr. Frances L. 
Johnson, Harry A., 
Kaan, Frances W., 
Keith, Anna M., 
Kelley, Anna F., 
Kelley, Anna L., 
Kelly, Winifred E., 
Kent, Mary D., 
Kerr, Mary, 
Kimball, Genenia M., 
Kring, Alida, . 
Lafiey, Florence R., 
Landry, Emile, 
Lane, Alice R., 
LaPiana, Angeline L., 
Larrabee, Herbert A., 
Laughton, Adele L., 
Laughton, Mary S., 
Lavin, Katharine M., 
Leach, Cora M., 
Leighton, Eva F., . 

. Phebe, . 
Lincoln, Lillian V., 
Litchfield, Dorothy G., 
Litchfield, Mildred D., 
Little, Anna M., 



Stoneham. 

Attleboro. 

Fall River. 

Lawrence. 

Mansfield. 

Franklin. 

Franklin. 

Lawrence. 

Southbridge. 

Newburyport. 

Hyannis. 

Fall River. 

Boston. 

Boston. 

Lynn. 

Boston. 

Somerville. 

Bridgewater. 

Cambridge. 

Salem. 

North Attleborough. 

Brockton. 

Weston. 

Belchertown. 

Boston. 

Lynn. 

Worcester. 

Bridgewater. 

Cambridge. 

Peabody. 

Boston. 

Boston. 

Boston. 

Bridgewater. 

Brockton. 

Westerly, R. I. 

Framingham. 

North Scituate. 

North Scituate. 

South Dartmouth. 



48 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



Littlefield, Mildred, Foxborough. 

Llewellyn, Blanche, Rockland, Me. 

Long, Marion E., Brockton. 

Loomis, Sarah A., Centerville. 

Lovering, Harriet H., Holyoke. 

Lowney, Cecilia A., . . . . . Somerset. 

Lumiansky, Rebecca, New Bedford. 

Lyman, Cassius S., Framingham Centre. 

Lyman, Warren B., Hopkinton. 

McCarthy, Ruphine A., . . . . Arlington Heights. 

McCorrison, Clara E., Warren, R. I. 

McCoy, Frank E., Lynn. 

McDermott, Catherine E., . . . . Lowell. 

McDonough, Katherine L., . . . . Warren, R. I. 

MacDougall, A. L., . . . . . Marlborough. 

MacDougall, Wm. J., Marlborough. 

McGourty, Annie V., Worcester. 

McGrath, Annie T., Worcester. 

McNeeland, Emma J., Bridge water. 

Maher, Margaret E., Worcester. 

Malley, L. Irene, Cohasset. 

Manning, Mabel M., Marblehead. 

Mansfield, Marion, Rockland. 

Marble, Earl M., Somerset. 

Marshall, Ethel N., Brockton. 

Martin, Marian A., Marblehead. 

Martin, May C," Weymouth. 

Mathews, Phebe E., Somerville. 

Maynard, Gertrude, Providence, R. I. 

Mears, Eva M., Gloucester. 

Mears, Florence L., Gloucester. 

Mellen, Mortimer H., Cliftondale. 

Mevis, Gladys W., Lowell. 

Meyer, Dorothea L., Roxbury. 

Millington, William H., .... Maynard. 

Minard, Bessie B., Georgetown. 

Morton, Sylvia S., Conway. 

Morris, Agnes, Boston. 

Morris, Eva C, Boston. 

Moseley, Ruth B., Needham. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



49 



Moynihan, 1 'lion E., 
Moynihan, Mary C, 
Mullane, Helen J., . 
Mullaney, Angeline, 

[nam, Caroline F., 
Nelson, Inez A., 
Ogden, Jessie L., 
O'Hara, Abigail L., 
O'Leary, Ellen J., . 

ry, Mary B., . 
Oliver, Andrew, 
Orem, Mary E., 
Osborne, Carver, 
Owens. Josephine M., 
Packer, Audrey E., 
Paine, Doris, . 
Paine, Gladys, 
Parker, Alvin D., . 
Parsons, J. S., . 
Parsons, Lillian R., 
Patterson, Wilhelmina, 

. Maude A., . 
Pennington, Rachel E., 
Perkins. A. Mabel, 
Perkins, Betsj^ H., . 
Perrin, Vernette L., 
Perry, Marion R., . 



Perry, Xellie A., 
Pinkert, Edna L., . 
Poole, Clarion C, . 
Pratt, E. L., . 
Pratt, Helen, . 
Prendergast, Mary E., 
Price, Wilfrid EL, . 
Provain, Idalia, 
Putnam, Ruth L., . 
Quinn, Julia A., 
Quinn, Mary A., 
Reed, Flora B., 
Regnier, Hortense E., 



Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Dorchester. 

Hyannis. 

Dorchester. 

Gloucester. 

Fall River. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Boston. 

Brighton. 

West Dennis. 

Taunton. 

Swansea. 

Palmer. 

Palmer. 

Bellows Falls, Vt. 

Canaan, Conn. 

Canaan, Conn. 

Salem. 

Pike, N. H. 

Presque Isle, Me. 

Central Falls, R. I. 

Attleboro. 

Attleboro. 

Weston. 

Holyoke. 

Maiden. 

Hudson. 

Roxbury. 

Shrewsbury. 

Southbridge. 

W T atertown. 

West Harwich. 

Holden. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Acton. 

Springfield. 



50 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



Reid, Reta J., Medford. 

Reilly, Mary Winifred, Coopers Mills, Me. 

Rice, Florence S., Fitchburg. 

Rice, Bertha W., Wilbraham. 

Richards, Bertha M., Blandford. 

Ripley, Ethel M., Westford. 

Roberts, Mildred C, Springfield, Vt. 

Roche, Lilian G., Worcester. 

Rogers, Elizabeth L., Quincy. 

Rogers, Martha A., Lynn. 

Rome, Bessie, Worcester. 

Rome, Sophie, Worcester. 

Ross, Nettie E., East Providence. 

Rourke, Mrs. E. A., Chicopee. 

Ruggles, Anne Holmes, Boston. 

Russell, Arlena F., Brockton. 

Rutherford, Helena K., .... Oakham. 

Ryan, Alice G., Jamaica Plain. 

Sampson, Helen M., Plymouth. 

Sargent, Harriett B., . *. . . . Gardner. 

Sargent, Ruth E., Groveland. 

Sargent, Ruth M., . . ' . . . . Westford. 

Sawyer, Elizabeth, Brookline. 

Sawyer, Mabel A., Lunenburg. 

Schmidt, Claudia, South Manchester, Conn. 

Schmidt, Elsa E., Salem Depot, N. H. 

Sears, Emilie S., East Dennis. 

Sears, Harold C, Danvers. 

Shanahan, Minnie A., Peabody. 

Shattuck, Harriett E., Pepperell. 

Shaugnessy, Caroline, Wareham. 

Sheridan, Anne, Wellesley Hills. 

Sheridan, Katherine, Wellesley Hills. 

Shute, Jennie E., Maiden. 

Slack, Ruth M., West Woodstock. 

Sleeper, Elizabeth A., Fitchburg. 

Small, Madaline, Roslindale. 

Smith, Alice C, Everett. 

Smith, Clara G., Attleboro. 

Smith, Ida J., Danvers. 



STATE XOHMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 51 



Smith, Marian L., .• Uxbridgc. 

Solon, Anna Pittsfield. 

Solon. Elizabeth L., Pittsfield. 

Somerby, Prank S Newburyport. 

Southwick, Mary J., Brockton. 

Spare. Susan F., New Bedford. 

Btaudenmayer, Clara A., .... Jamaica Plain. 

oson, Anabelle E., .... Gloucester. 

Steves, Emma L., Boston. 

Stone, Pauline H., . . . . . . Greenfield. 

Stretton, Ruth H., Woburn. 

Stuart, Flora M., Bridgewater. 

Stuart, Grace H., Newton. 

Stuart, Mary. Newton. 

Sullivan, Frances A., Ware. 

Sullivan, Grace L., Foxborough. 

Sullivan, M. Elizabeth, . . . ... Fitchburg. 

Swain, Helen D., Lowell. 

Swan, G. Hazel, Worcester. 

Sylvia, Helen M., Provincetown. 

Taft, Katherine H., Worcester. 

Taylor, Edith P., Roxbury. 

Taylor, Harriett E., Newtonville. 

Taylor, James B., Newtonville. 

Thayer, Harriett E., Conway. 

Thibodeau, Jeanette B., .... Brockton. 

Thompson, Susie G., Framingham. 

Thrasher, Avis, Roslindale. 

Tighe, Miriam A., Salem. 

Tilton, Cordelia W., Brockton. 

Tingley, Ruth H., Tewksbury. 

Tolman, Ethel D., Rockland. 

Tolman, Maria W., Rockland. 

Tracey, Dorothy C, Hinsdale. 

Traill, Annie H., Attleboro. 

Tranfaglia, Etta M., Dorchester. 

Trumbull, Florence V., Dalton. 

Veazie, Roslind, Hyannis. 

Vieira, Margaret, New Bedford. 

Waite, Mary L., Melrose. 



52 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



Warfield, Myra T., 
Warner, Grace, 
Warren, Arthur, 
Webster, Elisabeth S., 
Weeden, Effie A., . 
Wellington, Helen L., 
Wellington, Sara, . 
West, Helen A., 
West, Helen K, . 
Wetherbee, Mabel W., 
Weymouth, Blanche, 
White, Katherine E., 
Whitlock, Martha L., 
Whitney, Jessie P., 
Whittemore, Edwin J., 
Whittier, Nellie, . 
Wilbor, Chester H., 
Willard, Etta F., .• 
Wilson, Blanche M., 
Winn, Mary A., 
Winship, Hazel, 
Winslow, Marcia M., 
Wood, Celia M., . 
Woodruff, Alice B., 
Woodsom, Helen J., 
Woodward, Lovina H., 
Yorke. Gertrude C., 



Worcester. 

Sufneld, Conn. 

Worcester. 

West Somerville. 

Quincy. 

Belmont. 

Belmont. 

Brookville. 

Haverhill. 

Boxborough. 

Laconia, N. H. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Belmont. 

West Somerville. 

Taunton. 

Chelsea. 

Fitchburg. 

Charlemont. 

Newton Centre. 

Stoughton. 

Norwood. 

Springfield. 

Holliston. 

Amesbury. 

Framingham. 

Portland, Me. 



Students of Two-Week Courses. 

Anderson, Ann L., Fall River. 

Bates, Adaline, Hathorne. 

Buckley, Mary F., Boston. 

Burnham, Frances A., Allston. 

Chambers, Charlotte V., . . . . East Dedham. 

Clement, Alice W., Boston. 

Corson, Edith M., Newfield, Me. 

Donovan, Mary F., Concord Junction. 

Ellis, Josephine, Boston. 

Fielding, Ann B., Brighton. 



STA TK SORMAL SCHOOL AT HYANNIS. 



53 



Fisher, Doris. . 
Fitzgerald, Katharine, 
Katherine E. K 
Badley, Mildred E., 
Bumphrey, Katherine E 
Keane, Alice M., . 
Kelleher, Agnes G., 
Kelley, Ruth R., . 
Kelley, Teresa, 
Longdyke, Grace B., 
Marks, Catherine C., 
McCue, Anna B., . 
Mealey, Catlierine C., 
Murphy, Agnes C., 
Nash, Lucv H., 
Nichols, Margaret A., 
O'Connell, Mary L., 
O'Donnell, Mary *B., 
Peckham, Minerva A., 
Powers, Ruth, 
Quirk, Agnes L, 
Pveynolcls, Sadie G., 
Ripley, Dorothy E., 
Roper, Alice E., 
Ryan, Mae C., 
Spaulding, Annette B., 
Sullivan, Marion C., 
Ta} r lor, Alma, . 



Waquoit. 

Roxbury. 

Newbury. 

Everett. 

Lowell. 

Jamaica Plain. 

Natick. 

Boston. 

Natick. 

Maiden. 

Brighton. 

South Boston. 

Arlington. 

Dorchester. 

Allston. 

Hathome. 

Boston. 

Dorchester Center. 

South Walpole. 

Orange. 

Dorchester. 

Allston. 

Natick. 

Allston. 

Boston. 

Norridgewock, Me. 

Roslindale. 

Norwood.